Architects in US, UK achieve mutual recognition of credentials: Weekly regulatory news
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The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy. The US and UK enable mutual recognition of architecture credentials, Canadian businesses in critical industries face penalties over cybersecurity measures, and more in our Week in Brief.

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US and UK enable mutual recognition of architecture credentials

The government boards that register architects in the U.K. and U.S. signed a draft agreement to enable mutual recognition of architecture credentials between the countries. The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB) want to make it easier for architects to work between the two nations. Complete implementation of the agreement still depends on legislation from the UK government and further confirmation from each American state. “One of the primary benefits enjoyed by NCARB Certificate holders is the ability to pursue reciprocal licensure, and this agreement expands those benefits to a new continent,” according to NCARB president Alfred Vidaurri Jr. Read all about it at Arch Daily.

Poor cybersecurity to cost companies under new proposed Canadian bill

A new bill presented by Canada’s federal government would allow it to issue costly penalties for businesses in the transportation, energy, finance, or telecommunications industries that fail to bolster cybersecurity against attacks. The Act Respecting Cyber Security would allow government control over how businesses in these industries respond to even potential attacks. If passed, businesses in regulated industries would have to create or maintain cybersecurity programs that are capable of detecting potentially serious cyber-incidents and protect critical systems. Under the bill, regulators would be able to run audits to ensure compliance and hand out penalties of up to $15 million. Read more at CBC.

Missouri doctors permitted to prescribe unproven COVID drugs

Missouri doctors prescribing unproven COVID-19 drugs hydroxychloroquine or ivermectin no longer risk having their licenses revoked, courtesy of a series of new bills passed into law by Gov. Mike Parson. Although one of the bills, HB 2194, ostensibly had to do with exempting military contractors and employees from taking federal training programs by modifying existing professional licensing provisions, an amendment added by a state senator prevents pharmacists from questioning those that prescribe the drugs or from speaking with patients about their efficacy. Read more about it at FOX 4.

Illinois further details cannabis licensure plans

Illinois’ Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) has provided more information about plans to sell marijuana. Applicants for a license to sell cannabis in the state – who were selected in a series of three lotteries – will have to submit forms to the IDFPR by July 1, at which point the organization will work with the Illinois Department of Revenue to ensure applicants don’t owe money to the state or have delinquent taxes. Gov. J.B. Pritzker says the state has the most equitable adult-use cannabis program in the U.S. and praised the program for “expunging thousands of low-level cannabis convictions and investing tens of millions of dollars in cannabis proceeds in communities failed by the war on drugs.” Read more about it at Financial Regulation News and learn why craft grower licensure in the state has been put on hold at Cannabis Business Times.

Cannabis growers must surrender licenses, destroy products under agreement with regulator

Three cannabis cultivators will have to destroy their products and surrender business licenses after Missouri regulators and a licensee group found compromise in a legal dispute. The agreement settles allegations of regulatory violations in an attempt to close legal proceedings after Perrysville-based licensees were accused of “pervasive irregularities” that prevented state officials from confirming products from their cultivation facilities were tested. Two of the facilities allegedly used pesticides without proper training or personal protective equipment (PPE), according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

More news:

  • A Boca Raton woman is suing a massage therapist for what she alleges was sexual misconduct for years before eventually battering her. Other complainants have brought forward serious allegations against the same therapist.
  • A masseur and a social worker in Iowa are also facing licensing sanctions after being separately accused of crossing professional boundaries with their clients.
  • A fake nurse remained employed at a B.C. hospital despite a long list of complaints against her, according to a court filing.

Also noteworthy:

Got a news tip? Write us at editor@ascend.thentia.com

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Paul Leavoy
Written byPaul Leavoy
Paul Leavoy is Editor of Ascend Magazine and writes on occupational licensing, regulation, digital government, and public policy.

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