California cracks down on sexual misconduct in health care: Weekly regulatory news
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The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy. California forbids physicians from being re-licensed following sexual misconduct, Wisconsin works with the public sector to investigate nursing home complaints, and more in our weekly look at regulatory news.

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New law prohibits re-licensing for physicians following sexual misconduct 

California Governor Gavin Newsom recently signed into law a new bill forbidding physicians from receiving or renewing their medical licenses following incidents of sexual misconduct. Under the new provisions, the Medical Board of California (MBC) can deny licenses to applicants based on incidents of sexual misconduct, even if the corresponding disciplinary actions occurred more than seven years prior to application. If the licensee has been convicted in court of any offense that requires registration as a sex offender, the MBC can now automatically revoke their license. Supporters of the bill say it is an important step toward closing loopholes that allow convicted sex offenders to continue practicing. Read more at California Globe. 

Wisconsin investigates nursing home staff shortages 

An uptick in complaints against nursing homes in Wisconsin has prompted state officials to work with the private sector to have the homes inspected. The state is currently dealing with a shortage of both inspectors and nursing home staff, with around two-fifths of facilities having reported limited staff resources in the past month. Overall, more than 1,500 complaints have been filed against nursing homes in Wisconsin in 2022. Government leaders have partnered with Healthcare Management Solutions and the Long Term Care Institute to investigate the issue and inspect nursing homes that have been the subject of complaints around the state. Read more at the Edwardsville Intelligencer. 

California regulators levy fines against delinquent cannabis companies 

California’s Department of Cannabis Control (DCC) has asked for $128 million in restitution from businesses found to have manufactured or sold unlicensed products over the past two years. The regulator argues that the businesses implicated have virtually admitted to engaging in “unlicensed commercial cannabis activity” and are therefore obligated to pay fines to the state. Among the unlicensed products sold were cannabis edibles, concentrates, and manufacturing equipment. DCC wrote that since the offenses were knowingly committed, “the maximum allowable civil penalties are warranted.” Read more at Green Market Report. 

BC outlines new centralized regulatory framework for law 

The government of British Columbia has put forth a plan to create a single regulator in the province to govern lawyers, notaries, and paralegals. The initiative comes in part from an increase in registered BC notaries and a push to expand their scope of practice in recent years. The Canadian Bar Association BC Branch has come out in support of the new framework, writing that it would “allow for better coordination and regulation of the professions who provide different kinds of legal services.” Officials have expressed their intention to continue allowing lawyers to self-regulate despite the creation of the new agency. Read more at Canadian Lawyer.

California vetoes new cryptocurrency regulations 

Governor Gavin Newsom has vetoed a California bill intended to create a regulatory framework for cryptocurrency. The legislation would have established new licensure standards for crypto companies and created new rules regulating stablecoins. The governor argued that the bill was “premature” and thus unfit to be signed into legislation at the moment. A less rigid approach, according to Newsom, would allow government agencies to keep pace with the ever-changing world of digital assets. Despite vetoing the bill, the governor has stated his intention to work with the California legislature to make clear the state’s policy on cryptocurrency in the future. Read more at Blockworks. 

More news:

  • A new rule from the Natural Resources Commission concerning the regulation of deer hunters has been eliminated in Michigan after a vote by the state’s House of Representatives. The rule could have led to misdemeanor charges for hunters who fail to report to the Department of Natural Resources that they have harvested a deer within three days of doing so. 
  • A comprehensive package of policing reforms for the state of Ohio has been halted in its tracks, according to Rep. Cindy Abrams. The reforms, endorsed by Gov. Mike DeWine in the wake of the death of George Floyd, would have included banning chokeholds in most situations and mandating psychological assessments for all police recruits, among other provisions. 
  • Dr. Kristine Brecht, a King County plastic surgeon, had her license suspended by the Washington Medical Commission over allegations of not sedating patients properly and hiring uncertified staff. The doctor had, in the past, admitted to running an unlicensed facility and agreed at one point to stop practicing until she achieved certification. 

Also noteworthy:

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BC expands licensure pathway for international doctors: Weekly regulatory news 

The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy.
British Columbia expands licensure pathway for internationally educated doctors, Ohio amendment could change the future of social work, proposal to reduce cosmetology licensure hours in Virginia sparks backlash, and more in our weekly look at regulatory news.

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Jordan Milian
Written byJordan Milian
Jordan Milian is a writer covering government regulation and occupational licensing for Ascend, with a professional background in journalism and marketing.

IN BRIEF

Doctors handshaking.
British Columbia
BC expands licensure pathway for international doctors: Weekly regulatory news 

The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy.
British Columbia expands licensure pathway for internationally educated doctors, Ohio amendment could change the future of social work, proposal to reduce cosmetology licensure hours in Virginia sparks backlash, and more in our weekly look at regulatory news.

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