Connecticut adopts new interstate compacts for health care providers: Weekly regulatory news
WiB Nov. 14
The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy. Connecticut eases licensure restrictions for telehealth and telepsychology providers, Israel eases regulatory restrictions for fintech companies, and more in our Week in Brief.

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Connecticut adopts interstate compacts for telehealth and telepsychology providers

In a move forward for license mobility in Connecticut, the state has adopted the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact (IMLC) as well as the Psychology Interjurisdictional Compact (PSYPACT). These two acts are primarily intended to simplify the licensing process for telehealth providers who wish to offer their services across state lines. The IMLC, which goes into effect on October 1, offers a pathway for telehealth providers to obtain an Expedited License in Connecticut. However, applicants still must be reviewed by the state’s Medical Examining Board. The PSYPACT allows authorized psychologists to offer telepsychology services in Connecticut as well as temporary in-person services for up to 30 days in other jurisdictions that have adopted the compact. Read more in the National Law Review.

New Jersey Senate committee to hear testimony on veterans’ mental health issues 

New Jersey’s Senate Military and Veterans Affairs Committee will soon be reviewing several bills intended to increase the availability and affordability of mental health services for military veterans. During the public hearing, several participants will offer testimony on veterans’ mental health services. These include the president of the New Jersey Veterans Network, a representative from the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs, and an Essex and Hudson County veteran service officer. The hearing will also touch on state suicide prevention programs that focus on active-duty members, veterans, and military family members. Read more at Insider NJ.

North Carolina State Board of Education to review pay and licensure overhaul

North Carolina’s State Board of Education will soon receive a proposal for a dramatic overhaul in teacher licensure and pay systems. Van Dempsey, chairman of the Professional Educator Preparation and Standards Commission (PEPSC), said the commission will likely have made its final revisions to the proposal by the Nov. 10 deadline, at which point it will be passed on to the state board. Once the state board receives the proposal, it can only accept or reject it – the board cannot make any “substantive changes” if it chooses to adopt the rules. Additionally, many current laws do not allow the changes that PEPSC will likely propose, which means that the existing statute will need to be changed to accommodate the new rules. Read more at NC Policy Watch.

92% of child care providers sign on for Ontario’s $10-a-day care program

Of Ontario’s entire population of licensed child care providers, 92% have opted into the province’s $10-a-day care program as of the Nov. 1 decision deadline. For parents, the rebates have already started flowing in. Parents involved in the program are eligible to receive retroactive rebates of up to 25% for child care fees paid since the beginning of April. These fees are set to be reduced on average by 50% by the end of 2022, with September 2025 as a goal date for the target $10-a-day average. The provincial government will now focus on securing new funding and attempting to create tens of thousands more child care facilities in the years to come. Read more at Global News Canada.

New Israeli regulations ease licensure requirements for fintech organizations 

Fintech companies will now have an easier time operating in Israel, thanks to a new set of regulations from the country’s Knesset Finance Committee. These regulations bear some resemblance to a temporary rule that was effective until the end of 2021, but they contain several key changes. In essence, the provisions allow certain types of credit and financial providers to operate in Israel without obtaining a license. This applies to companies licensed in the U.S., the E.U., and the U.K., companies involved with payment services, and companies that solely offer business credit, among many other organizations. The exemptions will be applied retroactively from the start of 2022. They are intended to boost Israel’s involvement with international corporations in the fintech space and ease uncertainties that have developed since the expiration of 2021’s temporary provisions. Read more at JDSupra.

More news:

  • The Prince Edward Island government is currently pushing for its citizens to open their own licensed family home centers, noting that grants and other financial incentives exist for a full range of operational needs. Doreen Gillis, director of early childhood development at the Department of Education and Lifelong Learning, emphasized that the island is in serious need of housing for infants and toddlers. 
  • The Government of Saskatchewan will soon embark on a new mission to recruit health care workers in the Philippines. Citing a “strong and meaningful relationship” with the country, Minister of Health Paul Merriman expressed the government’s intention to target Manila in an attempt to attract its health care workers to the province. 

Also noteworthy:

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IN BRIEF

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BC expands licensure pathway for international doctors: Weekly regulatory news 

The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy.
British Columbia expands licensure pathway for internationally educated doctors, Ohio amendment could change the future of social work, proposal to reduce cosmetology licensure hours in Virginia sparks backlash, and more in our weekly look at regulatory news.

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Jordan Milian
Written byJordan Milian
Jordan Milian is a writer covering government regulation and occupational licensing for Ascend, with a professional background in journalism and marketing.

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Doctors handshaking.
British Columbia
BC expands licensure pathway for international doctors: Weekly regulatory news 

The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy.
British Columbia expands licensure pathway for internationally educated doctors, Ohio amendment could change the future of social work, proposal to reduce cosmetology licensure hours in Virginia sparks backlash, and more in our weekly look at regulatory news.

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