Law society suspects bar-exam cheating scandal: Weekly regulatory news
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The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy. Singapore plans to start licensing cybersecurity providers, Georgia lawmakers move to update their criminal database, and more in our weekly look at regulatory news.

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Investigation issues letters to possible bar-exam cheaters

An investigation team hired by the Law Society of Ontario (LSO) has issued letters to individuals who may be involved in a cheating scenario, according to an LSO press release. The ongoing investigation into LSO’s licensing examinations is centered around “strong indications” that examination content was improperly accessed through cheating, which would contravene the Examination Rules and Protocol and compromise the integrity of upcoming examinations. In essence, it would mean individuals could have cheated on their bar exams. The LSO says that evidence indicates the potential involvement of third parties in this activity. Read about it at The Toronto Star or CP24.

Michigan cannabis regulator replacing Marijuana Regulatory Agency

Michigan’s former Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA) is now the Cannabis Regulatory Agency (CRA), following a recent executive reorganization order by Governor Gretchen Whitmer. The CRA now regulates the state’s hemp processors and handlers, and Michigan’s Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) is going to continue to look after hemp cultivation in the state, and the new body is not planning to make material changes to affect hemp processor operations. The state has extensive crossover between its hemp and marijuana industries, principally surrounding cannabinoids. Read about it at The Daily News.

Singapore begins licensing cybersecurity service providers

The Cyber Security Agency of Singapore (CSA) is going to start licensing the cybersecurity service providers across the city-state in the interest of further safeguarding consumer interests and improving service standards, according to an announcement about the new licensing framework. The new licensing framework will require vendors offering penetration testing or managed security operations centers (SOC) to obtain a license since they need to access sensitive customer systems. Measures took effect immediately, but vendors already operating have been given until October 11, 2022, to apply. The CSA says this move addresses an “information asymmetry” between consumers and those who provide cybersecurity services. Read about it at ComputerWeekly.com.

Wisconsin regulators approve state’s largest renewable energy plant

Wisconsin’s Public Service Commission approved the construction of the state’s largest renewable energy plant. Supporters say the 465-megawatt Koshkonong Solar Energy Center will protect human health and the environment while helping the state diversify its energy economy and get off fossil fuels. Neighboring municipalities have expressed opposition to the plant although Milwaukee-based WEC Energy Group and Madison Gas and Electric plan to spend $649 million to buy it, injecting $140 million into the local economy and creating 600 jobs during peak construction. Read more at Wisconsin State Farmer.

Georgia passes bill to update criminal data, allow ‘proactive’ investigation of voter fraud

Lawmakers in Georgia have made moves to update the state’s criminal data reporting system and let the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) proactively investigate election fraud. State representatives want to ensure access to updated criminal records since it is a public safety issue for the judicial system and potential employers, housing companies and occupational licensing boards, all of which require criminal background checks. The measure also hands the GBI the jurisdiction to investigate “election fraud and election crimes,” prompting critics to suggest the rules could discourage Georgians from voting. Read on at KPVI.

More news:

  • Illinois’ Blackburn College was awarded a $250,000 two-year Teacher Residency Grant from the Illinois State Board of Education (IBSE) to help address the state’s teacher shortage by funding the school’s established Teacher Licensure Program (TLP).
  • The Washington State Utilities and Transportation Commission has announced a $198,000 settlement with First Student, a school-bus contracting company that accumulated hundreds of safety and procedural violations over two years, according to state regulators. The company admitted to nearly 400 safety violations, including failures to screen drivers for alcohol and drugs.
  • Oklahoma’s Medical Marijuana Authority is giving $2 million to the state’s Office of Juvenile Affairs (OJA) to support statewide evidence-based substance abuse interventions.

Also noteworthy:

Got a news tip? Write us at editor@ascend.thentia.com.

Doctors handshaking.

BC expands licensure pathway for international doctors: Weekly regulatory news 

The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy.
British Columbia expands licensure pathway for internationally educated doctors, Ohio amendment could change the future of social work, proposal to reduce cosmetology licensure hours in Virginia sparks backlash, and more in our weekly look at regulatory news.

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Paul Leavoy
Written byPaul Leavoy
Paul Leavoy is Editor of Ascend Magazine and writes on occupational licensing, regulation, digital government, and public policy.

IN BRIEF

Doctors handshaking.
British Columbia
BC expands licensure pathway for international doctors: Weekly regulatory news 

The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy.
British Columbia expands licensure pathway for internationally educated doctors, Ohio amendment could change the future of social work, proposal to reduce cosmetology licensure hours in Virginia sparks backlash, and more in our weekly look at regulatory news.

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