Ohio adopts Nurse Licensure Compact: Weekly regulatory news 
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The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy. Ohio expands nursing opportunities with the NLC, the Institute for Justice calls for the repeal of some licenses, an Ohio coalition urges the state to adopt universal licensure, and more in our weekly look at regulatory news.

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Ohio nursing board expands licensing options with NLC 

Ohio’s Board of Nursing has announced it is working with the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) to expand career opportunities for nurses in the state through the Nurse Licensure Compact (NLC). A new multistate license (MSL) option will allow Ohio nurses to practice across the 37 member NLC states, while unlocking job opportunities for experienced nurses from across the country who may desire to practice in Ohio.  

This move will also allow Ohio nurses to quickly provide critical care during disasters or medical emergencies in nearby NLC states; secure opportunities in the rapidly expanding world of telehealth; and grow their careers in a variety of other ways. Critically, it will streamline the often-complicated process of providing care across state lines. 

The NLC sets consistent standards to expand health care access while maintaining public protection at the state level, according to the NCSBN. To convert their license to an MSL, Ohio nurses will have to clear background checks and meet NLC licensing standards, as well as any other nursing licensure requirements in Ohio. Read more at Highland County Press. 

Institute for Justice report calls for repeal of ‘needless licenses’ 

A recent Institute for Justice report has called upon U.S. lawmakers to repeal needless licenses, reduce some steep licensing burdens, and prevent the adoption of new licenses. The third edition of License to Work looked at over 2,700 licenses across 50 states and the District of Columbia and found what it calls “questionable licenses and licensing burdens” across the nation. At the same time, it found that nearly 20% of licenses have become less burdensome and that more licenses have been eliminated than created since 2017. 

Among the reports more notable findings: 

  • Workers in 71 occupations face greater average burdens than entry-level emergency medical technicians, suggesting licensing burdens are not well-aligned with occupational risk.  
  • Though Interior design is only licensed in two states (and DC), it is the most difficult occupation to enter.  
  • Barbers and cosmetologists also rank as two of the most difficult professions to enter, despite being universally licensed.  

Read the full report here and see The Center Square’s take on Pennsylvania’s licensing burdens here. 

Virginia lowers teacher licensure exam scores 

Virginia’s Board of Education recently voted to lower minimum passing scores for chemistry, physics, and biology teacher licensure exams. These exams are mandatory for anyone seeking teacher licensure in the state, unless the applicant already holds a license from another state. The changes aren’t drastic; the passing score for chemistry, for example, has been lowered to 146 from 153.  

The topic was first raised in October when Joan B. Johnson, who serves as Assistant Superintendent for Teacher Education and Licensure, proposed to update Praxis exams with lower passing scores as a means of addressing the state’s teacher shortage. The Virginia Department of Education says 1,063 teaching positions were unfilled in the 2019-20 school year. Things haven’t improved – as of this past August, data suggests there are 2,594 teacher vacancies in the state. Read more at Parents Defending Education. 

Coalition urges Ohio lawmakers to adopt universal licensure recognition 

Ohio’s Buckeye Institute is urging state lawmakers to adopt universal occupational license recognition in an open letter authored by a coalition of parties including Americans for Prosperity-Ohio, Americans for Tax Reform, the Goldwater Institute, the National Taxpayers Union, and the Buckeye Institute itself.  

“The current occupational licensing system too often requires already-licensed out-of-state professionals to spend time and money to be licensed in Ohio,” report authors suggest. They have asked state legislators to adopt universal licensing recognition for out-of-state license holders, joining Pennsylvania, Missouri, and over 15 other states that have “already enacted strong licensing reforms.” Read the full letter here 

‘Reduce or eliminate’ licensing fees, says incoming Arizona Senate President  

Arizona’s Senate President-elect called for the reduction and elimination of fees for occupational licensing while presenting his inflation reduction agenda last week. In addition to asking the state government to combat rising living costs and removing Ariona’s rental tax, Warren Petersen pointed to the fees associated with professional licensing. “Whether you’re a barber, realtor, loan officer, contractor, or other licensed professional, you are required to pay fees to the state to hold your license,” Petersen wrote. “Let’s cut those in half or eliminate them altogether.” Arizonans earning less than 200% of the federal poverty level have had occupational licensing fees waived since 2017. Read more at The Center Square. 

More news: 

  • In a recent article, Forbes contributor Adi Gaskell highlighted a University of Connecticut study suggesting that, despite a widespread belief to the contrary, licensing isn’t a major barrier to mobility. Instead, researchers suggest other factors like family and amenities represent more pressing concerns. 
  • A controversial new pilot program in North Carolina could change how teachers in the state are licensed by requiring them to be evaluated before receiving pay raises.  

Also noteworthy:  

Interesting opinion, commentary, and analysis from the web: 

Disclaimer: The thoughts, opinions, and commentary of the articles we share links to in Week in Brief do not necessarily reflect those of Ascend Magazine or Thentia. 

Stay informed.

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Paul Leavoy
Written byPaul Leavoy
Paul Leavoy is Editor of Ascend Magazine and writes on occupational licensing, regulation, digital government, and public policy.

IN BRIEF

Health Care Regulation
Ohio lawmakers consider bill to localize licensure appeals: Weekly regulatory news 

The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy.
Ohio lawmakers consider bill to localize state agency licensure appeals, Canadian Medical Association welcomes new rules enabling health worker mobility in Ontario, and more in this week’s look at regulatory news.

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Ascend Magazine lives at the nexus of regulation, licensing, public policy, and digital government. We share news, insight, and exclusive commentary from leaders in regulation and technology. 

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