Oregon adds licensure requirements for pharma sales reps
The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy. In this week's news, a nurse gets prison time for tampering with painkillers, Connecticut suspends licensure requirements, and Texas proposes new workplace laws.

Thentia is a highly configurable, end-to-end regulatory and licensing solution designed exclusively for regulators, by regulators.

RELATED TOPICS

Thentia is a highly configurable, end-to-end regulatory and licensing solution designed exclusively for regulators, by regulators.

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

SHARE

Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on email
Share on facebook

Oregon adds licensure requirements for pharma sales reps

Taking effect on Jan. 1, 2022, Oregon recently approved a temporary rule implementing SB 763, which requires licensure of pharmaceutical sales representatives who visit health care providers in the state of Oregon for 15 or more days in a calendar year. Oregon’s Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) is also debating a proposed permanent rule that will govern long-term implementation of SB 763, to take effect in May 2022. Read more about the new law here.

Utah nurse gets three-year prison sentence for tampering with painkillers

A registered nurse in Utah was recently sentenced to three years in federal prison after being convicted of charges for fraudulently obtaining and tampering with pain medicine used to treat patients with moderate to severe pain. Nathan Pehrson, 41, was found guilty of stealing hydromorphone for personal use and replacing it with saline solution during his time working as a nurse at Intermountain Healthcare facility in Salt Lake City. Read the full story here.

Connecticut DPH temporarily suspends requirements for licensed health care professionals from other states

In response to the increasing number of COVID-19 hospitalizations, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) has temporarily waived the state’s license requirements for certain out-of-state health care professionals. The temporary order, which will apply for a period of 60 days, allows physicians, registered nurses, psychologists and other specified health care workers who are appropriately licensed, certified, or registered in another U.S. state to immediately practice in Connecticut. This has been the second such order of the DPH since the onset of the pandemic. Read the press release here.

100% of graduating nursing class in Arkansas passes licensing exam on first try

The May 2021 graduating class at the Jefferson Regional School of Nursing in Arkansas has registered a 100% pass rate for the National Council Licensure Examination. Established in 1981, the school offers a 17-month education program that leads to an Associate of Applied Science in Nursing degree. Read more from the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.

Also noteworthy:

Got a news tip? Write us at editor@ascend.thentia.com.

SHARE

Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on email
Share on facebook
Paul Leavoy
Written byPaul Leavoy
Paul Leavoy is Editor of Ascend Magazine and writes on occupational licensing, regulation, digital government, and public policy.

POLICY

Interstate compacts
Health Care
How do interstate compacts make licensing more efficient?

States are increasingly turning to interstate compacts as a way to help workers in licensed professions practice in multiple states while ensuring that the standards in place to protect the public are upheld. We take a look at different types of occupational licensure compacts and how they make licensing more efficient.

Featured

Ascend Magazine lives at the nexus of regulation, licensing, public policy, and digital government. We share news, insight, and exclusive commentary from leaders in regulation and technology. 

OCCUPATIONAL LICENSING REFORM

VOICES

CYBERSECURITY

LICENSE PORTABILITY