Major sports leagues support Quebec betting expansion: Weekly regulatory news
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The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy. This week in regulatory news, major sports leagues join the effort to modernize Quebec's sports betting industry, Kansas relaxes certain exam requirements for teacher licensure, and more.

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Kansas relaxes teacher licensing requirements: Week in Brief
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Major sports leagues support Quebec betting expansion 

Calls to expand Quebec’s legal sports betting industry are gaining momentum as three major sports leagues voiced their support for modernizing the province’s regulatory framework last week. Major League Soccer (MLS), the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the Canadian Football League (CFL) are echoing calls from the Quebec Online Gaming Coalition (CQJL) to allow private operators to offer their services in the province. 

The CQJL’s push for expanding Quebec’s sports betting industry began in May, when the association pointed toward Ontario as an example of effective modernization of the industry’s regulatory framework. According to a report by Deloitte in June 2023, Ontario’s multi-operator online gambling licensing system brought the province $469 million CAD in revenue. The CQJL believes similar measures in Quebec could bring in around $230 million.  

The CQJL is a trade association comprised of some of the biggest names in sports gambling, including DraftKings, Entain, and Flutter Entertainment. Commissioners from MLS, the NBA, and the CFL all expressed similar sentiments supporting industry expansion as a way to increase fan engagement, stressing that any new sports betting licensing regime should be transparent and promote responsible gambling. Read more at EGR

Nova Scotia Court of Appeal has no jurisdiction over licensing process, ruling finds 

According to a recent ruling from the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal, the court has no authority to review cases that pertain strictly to the licensing and registration process for paramedics. The ruling, which arose from a case involving the College of Paramedics of Nova Scotia in which the court dismissed an appeal, clarifies that appealing to the court is a valid form of recourse only in licensing cases which involve allegations of professional misconduct.  

The case, Hogg v. College of Paramedics of Nova Scotia (Registration Appeal Committee), involved the College denying a paramedic license to Sybil Hogg, who appealed to the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal. The College argued that the court only has jurisdiction to hear appeals in misconduct cases regarding professionals who are already licensed and registered, per the tribunal’s governing legislation (the Paramedics Act).  

Because Hogg’s appeal was merely about a case in which she was denied licensure, the appeals court ruled in favor of the College of Paramedics and the case was thrown out. As an applicant in the College’s registration and licensing process, she was subject to the decisions of the Registration Appeal Committee and no other authority. Read more about the case at Canadian Lawyer Magazine. 

Kansas State Board of Education relaxes teacher licensing requirements 

The Kansas State Board of Education has approved changes removing the requirement for aspiring educators to take one of the state’s previously mandated pedagogy exams to qualify for licensure. The board also approved changes establishing a process for the Licensure Review Committee to address situations in which prospective teachers have completed preparation courses but not yet passed their licensure exams after two attempts. 

The changes originated in 2022, when the Kansas State Department of Education’s (KSDE) Teacher Licensure team met with education stakeholders to discuss issues with testing. After a review process lasting roughly half a year, this working group submitted recommendations to the Professional Standards Board – one of which included removing the requirement to take the Principle of Learning and Teaching (PLT) exam. 

The reason the working group gave for removing the PLT exam requirement was that the exam measures work competencies that are already addressed more effectively by the state’s mandatory Work Sample performance assessment. Regarding the exams that will remain mandatory, the team is currently at work creating a review process for teachers who do not pass after two attempts, and “guidance will be shared once the final process is approved by the State Board.” Read more at KSDE.org. 

Pennsylvania begins implementation of Nurse Licensure Compact 

Pennsylvania’s Department of State has begun allowing nurses who hold multistate licenses (MSLs) via the Nurse Licensure Compact (NLC) to practice in the commonwealth. Following the first phase of compact implementation, which began Sept. 5, hospital systems throughout Pennsylvania are expressing hope that the newly streamlined path to licensure for out-of-state nurses will help to address staffing issues. 

Nicole Stallings, president and CEO of the Hospital and Healthsystem Association of Pennsylvania, said that despite implementing new models of care and using virtual care systems where possible, hospitals are still struggling to secure enough nurses to address patient needs. To hire out-of-state nurses via the NLC, hospitals must first file exemption forms requesting participation. These forms will then be subject to public comment. 

According to Michele Szkolnicki, senior vice president and chief nursing officer for Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, the NLC, while it may help in redistributing nurses to underserved areas, fails to address the nationwide nursing shortage at the heart of this issue. She said this could be better addressed by hiring more faculty in nursing schools and allowing more foreign-trained nurses to enter the country on work visas. Read more at Central Penn Business Journal.

Indiana says “not now” to universal license recognition 

In the first meeting of Indiana’s Interim Study Committee on Employment and Labor, committee members discussed universal occupational licensing and decided not to move forward with any such measures in the near future. During the meeting, lawmakers heard calls to analyze how universal license recognition would impact the state’s regulated industries, and leaders from several industries asked to be left out of any efforts to achieve such goals. 

Critics of the idea believe universal licensing could jeopardize local control and oversight of regulated professionals within the state, fostering an influx of professionals who have not met the state’s licensing standards and leading to safety concerns further down the line. While many appreciated the policy goals behind universal recognition, most critics warned that efforts to achieve it would need to be executed carefully and with the backing of substantial research. 

According to data compiled by the Indiana Professional Licensing Agency, license reciprocity in the state is mostly limited to Indiana’s participation in four active interstate compacts. When committee chair Sen. Linda Rogers asked if lawmakers had heard from industries that did support universal licensing, she was met with silence. She later told reporters that there is not yet a planned timeline for the completion of the studies critics have called for. Read more at the Indiana Capital Chronicle. 

More news:

  • The National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO) has selected the Illinois Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT) as a finalist in the Cybersecurity category for its annual State IT Awards, which will be announced in October. The current lineup of finalists includes 31 entities across 10 categories from nearly 90 nominations. 
  • A recent survey of businesses in Connecticut has found that 81% of employers are facing difficulties finding and retaining staff, with many saying the greatest obstacle to growth has arisen from a lack of skilled job applicants. To address this issue, state agencies are currently working with schools, private companies, and trade unions on workforce development initiatives. 
  • Lawmakers in Canberra, Australia, have introduced legislation that would create extra licensing and training requirements for electricians if passed. The Building and Construction Legislation Amendment Bill 2023, proposed by Minister for Sustainable Building and Construction Rebecca Vassarotti, aims to strengthen the jurisdiction’s regulatory framework and ensure safer construction standards for things like medical gas systems.

Also noteworthy:

Interesting opinion, commentary, and analysis from the web:

Disclaimer: The thoughts, opinions, and commentary of the articles we share links to in Week in Brief do not necessarily reflect those of Ascend Magazine or Thentia. 

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Jordan Milian
Written byJordan Milian
Jordan Milian is a writer covering government regulation and occupational licensing for Ascend, with a professional background in journalism and marketing.

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Alberta physicians criticize plans to subsidize nurse practitioner clinics: Weekly regulatory news

The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy.
This week in regulatory news, professional communities clash over plans to publicly fund nurse practitioner clinics in Alberta, California considers an alternative pathway to licensure for lawyers, and much more.