Rhode Island legalizes cannabis while Delaware rejects it: Weekly regulatory news 
The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy. Rhode Island legalizes cannabis while Delaware rejects it, New Jersey establishes police licensure, Alaska expedites licensing, and more weekly regulatory news.

Thentia is a highly configurable, end-to-end regulatory and licensing solution designed exclusively for regulators, by regulators.

RELATED TOPICS

Thentia is a highly configurable, end-to-end regulatory and licensing solution designed exclusively for regulators, by regulators.

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

SHARE

Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on email
Share on facebook

Rhode Island becomes 19th state to legalize marijuana  

Rhode Island has officially legalized marijuana for personal use for adults 21 and over. The legalization bill, which was signed into law after the General Assembly passed the associated legislation, also expunges past convictions and establishes a new framework for sales and taxation at stores that are sanctioned by the state. The law immediately legalizes marijuana possession statewide, though retail sales won’t start until December. Recreational users will also be able to grow up to six plants at home, three of which can be mature. Watch Gov. Dan McKee sign the bill into law here.  

Delaware Governor rejects cannabis legalization bill 

Gov. John Carney of Delaware vetoed legislation that would have made it legal to possess small amounts of cannabis. The measure would have legalized possession of no more than 1 ounce of marijuana for those over 21, permitting individuals to share marijuana with others while avoiding a sales scheme like those used in other states. The Governor said he supports decriminalization but won’t go as far as legalization. Read about it on The Hill.

New Jersey announces plans to establish police licensing bill 

New Jersey has announced proposed legislation that would establish a statewide police licensing program. If enacted, the bill would require all law enforcement officers to have active and valid licenses issued by the Police Training Commission (PTC) in order to be employed as officers in the state. Most other states have a police licensing program in place. If passed, the PTC would develop the licensure process and qualification standards for officers and applicants, which would include requirements for psychological examination, post-academy ongoing professional training requirements, and not engaging in conduct that advocates the violent overthrow of the government. Read more at The Observer.

Directive calls for faster professional licensing in Alaska 

Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy has issued an order that calls for a faster professional licensing process. His office said the order will lessen administrative burdens on applicants for professional licenses and address the state’s immediate need for accelerated licensure and the “backlog of Alaskans who are waiting for licensure in order to legally enter the workforce in their chosen field.” The new order calls for state professional licensing boards to implement expedited temporary licensing measures and to recall outdated or impractical regulations by September. Read more at KINY.

Michigan eases licensing process for out-of-state nurses 

Members of Michigan’s Joint Committee on Administrative Rules (JCAR) voted to ease the licensure process for nurses from other states who want to work in Michigan. The committee voted unanimously to revise a rule that makes it hard for nurses licensed in other states or countries to get a license in Michigan, one of a few states requiring nurses educated outside of Michigan to take another exam before licensure. The reforms allow out-of-state nurses to submit curriculum documentation and apply for licensure, bypass the additional-exam requirement, and apply for reciprocity to practice in Michigan without retaking an exam. See Vice Chair Steve Carra’s release here.

Other news: 

  • A Texas agency has revoked a 62-year-old woman’s massage therapist license over a crime committed in 1992. 
  • California’s DMV is seeking a consultant to help with its massive IT Modernization project. 
  • A British Columbia man is under investigation after being associated with a scheme to provide Mexican nationals fake credentials to work for local horse trainers. 

Also noteworthy: 

Stay informed.

Get our weekly roundup of regulatory news.​

IN BRIEF

N.L. doctors oppose proposed government say in licensing: Weekly regulatory news 

The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy.
N.L. doctors oppose proposed government say in licensing, New Mexico licensing department hit by cyberattack, Virginia moves to lower barriers to teacher licensure, and more in our weekly look at regulatory news.

Read More »
Week-in-brief-Oct-17-2022-banner-cropped

Cyberattacks disrupt major US health provider: Weekly regulatory news

The Week in Brief is your weekly snapshot of regulatory news and what's happening in the world of professional licensing, government technology, and public policy.
Cyberattacks cause issues for one of the largest U.S. health systems, North Carolina moves away from exam-only school principal licensure, and more in our weekly look at regulatory news.

Read More »

SHARE

Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on email
Share on facebook
Paul Leavoy
Written byPaul Leavoy
Paul Leavoy is Editor of Ascend Magazine and writes on occupational licensing, regulation, digital government, and public policy.

Featured

Ascend Magazine lives at the nexus of regulation, licensing, public policy, and digital government. We share news, insight, and exclusive commentary from leaders in regulation and technology. 

OCCUPATIONAL LICENSING REFORM

VOICES

CYBERSECURITY

LICENSE PORTABILITY